Mission: To promote the appreciation of wildlife on and around Union Bay and a higher level of harmony between humanity and nature.

(It is fine for educators and artists to use any of the photos on this blog as long as when publicly displaying the photo or related artwork the following comment is included, "The original photo sourced from http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com".)

Monday, November 19, 2012

Capitol Hill Snowy - Updates

11-24-12:

This morning the Sarvey Wildlife Care Center reported that the Capitol Hill Snowy Owl has continued to eat well this week and has been gaining weight. This has resulted in her being moved outside to a conditioning pen. This allows her more freedom of movement and will help prepare her for complete freedom. Her actual date of release is still not known as of this morning. To see photos of the CHSO click HERE.


11-19-12:

Suzanne from Sarvey Wildlife Care Center reports that the Capitol Hill Snowy Owl is responding well and will hopefully be released in the next few days.
Note: The photo above is not the Capitol Hill (CH) Snowy, however it is the closest likeness available. The CH bird is a female and generally females have darker markings than the mature males. 

Suzanne says the CH Snowy was picked up because its tail was not functioning properly and the bird was very, very thin. She has been hydrated, fed and X-rayed, the Snowy not Suzanne. The X-rays show no spinal damage and for the first time since her rescue she has fanned her tail feathers. This is a positive sign that the tail is going to be OK. The Snowy's weight has remained stable since the rescue so she is eating. 

Suzanne says there is a requirement that, whenever feasible, rescued creatures are released within 10 miles of where they were found. The time and location of the Snowy's release is not yet known, however I hope to be able to provide photo and video coverage of the event.

Sarvey Wildlife Care Center's mission is,

"To save the lives of sick, orphaned, injured, displaced, and debilitated wild animals entrusted to our care so that they may be successfully returned to their native habitat.
To offer educational opportunities that encourage a greater appreciation of the uniqueness and perfection of each species and the ecologic challenges facing them."

Current patients at Sarvey include Barred Owls, Barn Owls, Hawks, Crows and Fawns. Animals that have recovered and been recently released are Coyotes, Raccoons, Skunks and even Bobcats.
If you would like to learn more about the educational and volunteer opportunities at Sarvey Wildlife please follow this link.

Here is one more Snowy Owl photo. Don't the brown markings on the birds back and wings look a bit like geese in flight?

The difference in the markings between just these two birds is amazing. Is there any other local bird species with so much variation in coloring, especially when you consider mature males can be almost pure white. 

More updates to follow.

Larry

PS: Please click HERE if you did not read the weekend post on The Magical Snowy. It includes some rather unique Snowy Owl photos.

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